Saved From Suicide

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A Japanese girl we shall call Miyoko was a good student until her life began falling apart in Junior High School. Over the years, her parents’ rocky marriage worsened. Just when divorce appeared imminent, Miyoko’s mother surprised everybody by running off with a secret boyfriend. One can only surmise the reasons for what transpired next–perhaps guilt over abandoning her family contributed–but to everyone’s shock the mother and her boyfriend committed joint suicide.

A tragedy of this magnitude made headline news. Adding to the trauma, one investigative reporter uncovered evidence that Miyoko’s twin brothers were not really her biological brothers. Miyoko was devastated and disoriented. Her grades dropped as she spent more and more time away from home, running with the “wrong crowd” and succumbing to many of the bad habits that tempt wayward youth. Depression and hopelessness became her constant companions, leading to several suicide attempts of her own.

Then Miyoko found a boyfriend. Their mutual feelings for one another deepened into love and eventual marriage. They lived near her husband’s kind parents, who provided the stable family relationships Miyoko so urgently needed. At age eighteen the teenage bride was healing from her wounds of the past and expecting a child. Just as things were looking up, tragedy struck again–Miyoko’s husband was killed in a car accident.

The young mother-to-be was grief-stricken. She had only begun to gain control of her own life. Practically a child herself, how could she tend to the needs of an infant as a single parent? This was the final blow. Depression and hopelessness returned. Life had always been difficult. Now it was unbearable. Miyoko would get through the funeral in honor of her husband, but then she would end the awful pain as her mother had done.

After the funeral, the grieving bride struggled to think clearly through depression. “What is the most efficient way to end it all? No slip ups this time. I’ve struggled long enough. I want it over!” She found an isolated bench in a park where she could finalize her suicide plan in private. Although she feared the act of killing herself, she hoped it would end the pain in her heart.

Head bowed in deep thought, Miyoko awakened to a sensation that she was not alone. Cautiously she raised her eyes in search of the intruder. Blinking through tears, she perceived a boy about age five standing before her in the air. Miyoko immediately knew the boy was her unborn son. His message: “I love you and want to live.”

Miyoko realized she had been so wrapped up in her own needs as a pregnant teen widow, that her child’s future had not really occurred to her until that moment. The boy’s enthusiasm to begin earth life, coupled with the love he radiated to her as his future mother, provided a whole new perspective. Miyoko recognized that life is bigger than self, and extends beyond earth boundaries. What irony–as she planned death, her son was planning life!

Comforted and encouraged by her son’s prebirth visit, Miyoko chose life for both of them. She abandoned all suicide plans and returned to her in-laws. They had lost a son, but she could give them a grandson. With open arms they welcomed their daughter-in-law into their home and virtually adopted her. Months passed and she bore the son she’d seen in her prebirth vision.

Compiled by Sarah Hinze